Size of the Apkallu Artefact

The size of the artefact could be very small like a cuneiform cylinder seal or much larger like the Code of Hammurabi. There is clearly a trade-off between practical build size, cost for production (and reproduction), and a minimum size required to convey the necessary information and knowledge. Another issue is making an artefact that can actually be found. The current thinking is that the artefact will be between 6 - 12 inches in diameter, similar to a football in size.

 Sumerian cylinder seals, which tend to be around 1 inch in length. The one shown is 2.2 cm (7/8 inch) long and is a  cylinder seal with frieze depicting a standing robed figure in advancing pose facing a standing figure in flounced robe with hands raised, star above a small dancing figure, fourth robed figure to the rear, three columns of cuneiform text. It dates from Old Babylonian 20th - 18th Century B.C and is made of Hematite. The seal also contains text of cuneiform writing (credit: K. F. Long, from private collection of the same).

Sumerian cylinder seals, which tend to be around 1 inch in length. The one shown is 2.2 cm (7/8 inch) long and is a  cylinder seal with frieze depicting a standing robed figure in advancing pose facing a standing figure in flounced robe with hands raised, star above a small dancing figure, fourth robed figure to the rear, three columns of cuneiform text. It dates from Old Babylonian 20th - 18th Century B.C and is made of Hematite. The seal also contains text of cuneiform writing (credit: K. F. Long, from private collection of the same).

 Code of Hammurabi, dating to 1754 BC, constructed under the orders of the 6th Babylonian king Hammurabi. It is 2.25 m (7.4 ft) tall contains text written in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script carved into the diorite stele. It consists of 282 laws (credit: Photo by K. F. Long, located in Louvre, Paris).

Code of Hammurabi, dating to 1754 BC, constructed under the orders of the 6th Babylonian king Hammurabi. It is 2.25 m (7.4 ft) tall contains text written in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script carved into the diorite stele. It consists of 282 laws (credit: Photo by K. F. Long, located in Louvre, Paris).